Intangible Cultural Heritage & Gender

Find here a very interesting document on Intangible Cultural Heritage and Gender published by UNESCO.

In the publication, gender disparities and women´s role in intangible cultural heritage transmission are raised from a very interesting perspective. Recognising inequality suffered by women but at the same time, enhancing the value of cultural heritage contribution to women´s role in society.

A must read you need to complement with UNESCO Gender Equality. Heritage and Creativity report.

 

Provocative Fiber Art Made by Women

THE ANCIENT GREEKS put fate in the hands of three old women, goddesses who spun the thread of life, twisted it to allot each individual a measure of joy or sorrow, and wielded the “abhorred shears” (in the poet John Milton’s phrase) that could cut life short. The Greeks knew something that artists, along with a new generation of “craftivists” (people combining craft with activism), are rediscovering — that fiber (woven, knitted, braided, quilted, crocheted, embroidered) can be an expressive medium, one more powerful, perhaps, for its ubiquity. Textiles, after all, accompany us on nearly every step of life: We are born and swaddled, buried in shrouds;

An article written by LESLIE CAMHI published on MARCH 14, 2018 at the https://www.nytimes.com/ and shared at Craftivism Lab.

This article makes a review of relevant artists using textiles to speak out. From Albers to the Pussy Hat initiative, you will find several references to wonderful experiences and stories handmade by women.

Some of the Most Provocative Political Art is Made With Fibers

The Greeks knew something that artists, along with a new generation of “craftivists” (people combining craft with activism), are rediscovering — that fiber (woven, knitted, braided, quilted, crocheted, embroidered) can be an expressive medium, one more powerful, perhaps, for its ubiquity. Textiles, after all, accompany us on nearly every step of life: We are born and swaddled, buried in shrouds; most of us are even conceived between sheets.

….

Sophia Narrett, a recent Rhode Island School of Design graduate whose solo exhibition of embroideries opens at Brooklyn’s BRIC Arts/Media center in May, wrote in an email, “When an object is developed by human hands for hundreds of hours, it leaves a quality in the surface that can be sensed.”

Provocative Fiber Art Made by Women

THE ANCIENT GREEKS put fate in the hands of three old women, goddesses who spun the thread of life, twisted it to allot each individual a measure of joy or sorrow, and wielded the “abhorred shears” (in the poet John Milton’s phrase) that could cut life short. The Greeks knew something that artists, along with a new generation of “craftivists” (people combining craft with activism), are rediscovering — that fiber (woven, knitted, braided, quilted, crocheted, embroidered) can be an expressive medium, one more powerful, perhaps, for its ubiquity. Textiles, after all, accompany us on nearly every step of life: We are born and swaddled, buried in shrouds;

An article written by LESLIE CAMHI published on MARCH 14, 2018 at the https://www.nytimes.com/ and shared at Craftivism Lab.

This article makes a review of relevant artists using textiles to speak out. From Albers to the Pussy Hat initiative, you will find several references to wonderful experiences and stories handmade by women.

Some of the Most Provocative Political Art is Made With Fibers

The Greeks knew something that artists, along with a new generation of “craftivists” (people combining craft with activism), are rediscovering — that fiber (woven, knitted, braided, quilted, crocheted, embroidered) can be an expressive medium, one more powerful, perhaps, for its ubiquity. Textiles, after all, accompany us on nearly every step of life: We are born and swaddled, buried in shrouds; most of us are even conceived between sheets.

….

Sophia Narrett, a recent Rhode Island School of Design graduate whose solo exhibition of embroideries opens at Brooklyn’s BRIC Arts/Media center in May, wrote in an email, “When an object is developed by human hands for hundreds of hours, it leaves a quality in the surface that can be sensed.”